Chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF)

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Term Chemical specific adjustment factor
Description Default safety/uncertainty factors have been used for over 40 years to estimate health-based guidance values based on no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) or lowest-observedadverse-effect levels (LOAELs) from studies in animals.
Definition Chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF)

Default safety/uncertainty factors have been used for over 40 years to estimate health-based guidance values based on no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) or lowest-observedadverse-effect levels (LOAELs) from studies in animals. A value of 100 is normally used by bodies such as the Joint FAO/WHO Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants (JECFA) and the Joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Pesticide Residues (JMPR) to derive an acceptable daily intake (ADI), a tolerable daily intake (TDI) or a reference dose (RfD) for the general population based on a NOAEL or LOAEL from a chronic study in animals. The approach under which CSAFs would be used in risk assessment has been such that in the absence of data, the usual default uncertainty factor would be used. This does not necessarily mean that the default of 100 is the ideal value; it is simply recognition that this reflects the common current approach to deriving a health-based guidance value for the general population.

References http://www.inchem.org/documents/harmproj/harmproj/harmproj2.pdf

http://www.tera.org/Publications/risk%20policy%20report-nauman%20et%20al%202005.pdf  

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